Monday, February 04, 2013

God Made A Farmer

This Dodge commercial was featured during the Superbowl last night.  I didn't watch the Superbowl, but the commercial circulated around Facebook many times over since it aired.  When I first watched it, I fell in love with it.  I even teared up.

But then I watched it again.  And again, and as much as the narrative was moving and powerful, the pictures were emotional for me in a completely different sense.



The first time I watched the commercial, I listened more than watched.  The second time, I showed it to my husband, asked him excitedly "Have you seen this?!!!" he said "Yes, and it's great, but it's not really our kind of farming...."  Ummmm.....what?  So I watched it again.

At the risk of sounding nit-picky...

The video totally glorified the industrial farmer.

Oh, how I wish instead of field after field and row after row of corn, they had instead chosen farm after farm of family raised produce, free-range eggs, greenhouses full of seedlings, farmers sitting at a stand inside a farmer's market selling their blood, sweat, and tears to the local community, instead of a farmer selling his soul to the government.

I had to wonder......is that corn genetically modified?  Does this farmer know the environmental wound he has created by plowing down acres of land in it's natural state only to be regenerated by GM corn and soybean seeds, followed by an ample dousing of fertilizers and pesticides?  Does he realize the years of damage his soil has undergone?  Does he know his land is completely depleted of all of its natural minerals in order to accommodate his easygoing farming methods only to be supported by a government subsidy?

I fell for it.  My emotions were tugged on and I was so very easily sucked in.

There were no struggles with the USDA or the FDA.  No issues with zoning or destroyed freedoms or dashed hopes and dreams.  No SWAT team invading a family owned poultry farm destroying all of their products.  Where was the picture of the real American farmer?

When someone asks you what you do, do you tell them you're a farmer?  I promise their next question is this, "What do you raise?"  They expect to hear you say that you raise corn or soybeans.  No one expects you to say, "I farm a sustainable homestead fully capable of feeding my entire family and local community, powered by my own two hands, and my livelihood and success rests on hard work and the Lord's blessings."  Try that next time and see what happens...

That being said, I loved the tribute.  And I respect farmers of all makes and models.  Anyone who is strong enough to wear the title "farmer" and endure the criticism and ridicule that goes along with it, has earned the respect.  I just don't to be confused with those who have sold out to freedomless government funding and rest in a false sense of security.

But honestly, the commercial still makes me tear up.........

6 comments:

Quinn said...

I noticed the overarching big-ag theme of the images, which although beautiful and done in such a way to drive emotions, it was the words that really struck a chord with me. We were told this year, and I still can't believe it was a pastor that said it, but he called our lifestyle (and therefore most farmers by default) sinful!!!! He said that being tied down to the obligations of our farm, evening feedings and milkings, violates the fellowship model he sees set forth in the NT. I wonder where he thinks we ought to get our food from as we sit round the table with various families throughout the week!! So I appreciated this simply for the reason that God in Genesis 2, well.... He made a farmer ;)

Homestead Journey said...

You're right, I probably should have made that more clear in my post! I LOVED the words. They pretty much hit home regarding the long days, nights, and weeks of a farmer, yet such a fulfilling and fruitful life. My favorite was at the end when the son told the father he wanted to do the same work. ;) I hope to hear that from all of my children one day...

LindaG said...

We aren't into sports either. And where we are now, our internet doesn't lend itself to video viewing. But I had heard of this, so I appreciate you explaining it to us.

Have a blessed week! ♥

Stephanie H said...

I felt the same way! I listened intently on the message, but when I saw the areal image of a combine over perfectly lined row's, I thought to myself, "GMO's?" What propaganda! Still, I hope it made some people realize there is life behind their food. Farming has never been appreciated and perhaps those few minutes caused some to be more grateful.

Wolfman said...

Please, don't go too hard on the guys that farm big. We catch a lot of flak for pesticides and industrial farming, but the same soul is in it. We worry just as much about the soil quality, the yield, the cost of living. I know people like to yell about GMOs and subsidies- but it really isn't the devil's work. Industrial farmers may use different methods, or more chemicals and fertilizers, but we are still farmers, and our ties to the land and the soil run just as deep, and margins are as thin as they ever have been. Just sayin'.

Homestead Journey said...

You're right Wolfman, I truly respect and admire any style and type of farmer. I only with there were more credit and recognition given to the small-scale farmer. Thanks for your hard work, is sad so many people don't know where their food source
comes from.

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